Asset 1quiz.pngThis morning I looked around for either pure javascript or custom service solutions for trivia or quiz embeds for SharePoint. The out-of-the-box survey web part wouldn’t allow the kind of features I needed such as showing a message upon submission about correct and incorrect answers, and I wanted something more robust than a newsfeed or Yammer quiz. I also wanted users to easily be able to change their own quiz questions and answers and no high-maintenance code solution was going to cut it.

What I learned? There aren’t a lot of free solutions out there for quick quiz creation and embedding in SharePoint. And the ones that are out there don’t look the greatest. Then I remembered Microsoft Forms has a quiz function! Don’t these look great? Even better – you can embed in SharePoint Server/On-Prem or SharePoint Online/O365!

sidebyside

Microsoft Form’s quiz capabilities are incredible. In five minutes you can create a quiz that looks good, is easy to update and has features ordinarily only available with a premium subscription through other services. And as seen above, you can embed the results as well, making voting fun or showing a group how everyone is performing as a whole on a topic quiz. Here are some of the great features you get with Microsoft Forms:

Advertisements

newsfeed3.png

One of the greatest business value features of a site newsfeed webpart would obviously be to know when people are participating, asking questions, etc. This way moderators or other interested parties could go in and respond in a timely manner. And while there’s no straightforward way to get these notifications from the webpart itself, there’s a workaround. Follow these steps once you have a newsfeed webpart on your site (by default, most team sites have them already).

tooltiplinkedtitlesIn a recent post, I discussed hyperlinking URL title text and adding tooltips. I used the above screenshot which also illustrates what we’ll accomplish in this post which is to remove the select/deselect checkmark column, column headers, toolbar edit/new options and chrome border. This leaves us with a simple title and list. Pick and choose what you’d like to remove for your specific needs, and let me know if you run into any issues.

tooltiplinkedtitlesLet’s put those link lists to good use. I wanted one master or parent link list with a number of views. I would then use those views in different list view web parts across my site, removing the toolbar (view/edit/add options), column headers, chrome border and select/deselect checkmark column so that essentially I had a section of my page with a header/chrome title like “HR Forms” (removing default link to “parent” list) and then just a list of hyperlinked form titles with tooltips providing more info on each form as seen above. This post will cover how to get the hyperlinked title text with tooltip. Another post coming soon will cover the “clean-up” of the list view web part so that you’re left with a title and list items alone.

In one of my projects, we built a directory largely based on this article with content created by Stacy Deere-Strole of Focal Point Solutions. Something we ran into was wanting to include multiple departments in our base search query (not refiners, as that only narrows our results instead of expanding them). We also wished to eliminate multiple results in the JobTitle property within the query text. While this is a simple solution, hopefully it will save you some trial and error in writing your search language.