Highlight specific column headers in a SharePoint list

columnheaderhighlight.png

Highlighting specific column headers can be useful in drawing attention to specific information areas to make sure they’re complete or just to aid users in seeing the most important info quickly.

You can insert this script in a Script Editor webpart or save it in a css file in your Site Assets and reference the link in a content editor web part on the list page (much more accessible and easy to edit later).

Simply replace “Column1” with the exact name of your column header. Repeat the script as many times as you wish for each column header you want to highlight. Remember to change the script if you change a column name. And if this yellow isn’t your thing, check out this color wheel to help pick a new color code to use in your script.

[code]

<style>

.ms-vh-div[DisplayName="Column1"]

{

background-color:#FFFF66;

}

.ms-vh-div[DisplayName="Column2"]

{

background-color:#FFFF66;

}

</style>

[/code]

 

 

Solution: Microsoft Flow error “The query to field ‘/fieldname/LinkTitleNoMenu’ is not valid”

I recently ran into the following error message in Microsoft Flow that was triggered by a SharePoint – modified list item flow: “The query to field ‘/fieldname/LinkTitleNoMenu’ is not valid.” You’ll see this message in some cases when lookup columns are being utilized on the lists you’re referencing in Microsoft Flow.

This error was caused, at least for me, as a result of setting my “destination” list’s lookup column setting to display as Title (linked to item) instead of just Title. The following details the steps involved in fixing it.

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Simplify site-wide SharePoint list and form revisions by utilizing lookup columns

You may have several forms or lists using dropdown menus across your site that you would have to update if, say, an individual resigned, or a department changed its name, or a building relocated. Manage this type of information (individuals, departments, buildings, etc. frequently used in lists and forms)  in separate lists that we’ll then use to create site-wide lookup columns to replace the many individual dropdowns across our sites that are repetitious. Basically, we’ll update the information in one place and know that it’s updated everywhere it’s needed across our site (or site collection if you’re familiar enough to go the extra mile with collection content types or Microsoft Flow, if your permissions aren’t at the site collection level).

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SharePoint list cross-site publishing alternative using Microsoft Flow

listcopyprocess.JPG

It’s not easy to show a list (or part of a list)  from one site collection on another. There are data view web parts you could try in SharePoint Designer, content search queries  and page viewers in SharePoint web parts and then some scripting methods you could try, but I, in my enterprise environment, had no luck with those. This method, however, utilizes Microsoft Flow and works flawlessly. Here are a couple great features:

  • Permissions are completely flexible. Set the “new” list to view only or whatever permissions you like while keeping tight control over the original. People will not be able to access the original list or site collection but they’ll see your up-to-date info you’re wanting to share.
  • You can set this up so it’s a one-way publishing experience so updates on list 1 show on list 2, but updates on list 2 don’t show on list 1 OR you can set it up two-way so each list will update the other, creating a shared list experience without allowing permissions to access each other’s site collections

So let’s get started!

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Show last modified date for a SharePoint list without using code

listmodified.JPGSo you want your viewers to know the last time data was refreshed or updated in your SharePoint list without having the list’s default “modified” column repeating the same date hundreds of times and taking up horizontal space.

There are a number of solutions out there to show the date a list was last modified using code. This solution provides an option best used with lists you bulk update, or copy and paste to replace all data regularly, but requires no coding. It basically pulls out the “last modified” date of your first list item and displays it at the top as seen above. This solution is not for you if you are updating only specific items within a list.

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Adding sticky/floating headers to a SharePoint list

Outcome:

stickyheadersbeforeafter

Intro:

Large lists carry with them a number of challenges, one being the ease of keeping everything straight when you’re thirty scrolls deep into a page. Sticky/floating headers are an excellent addition to your SharePoint lists that keep your headers at the top of your columns no matter where you’re at in the list for ease of viewing. This solution uses a script created by Daniel Stölzner of spoodoo.com and I’ve added a reference to jquery to simplify steps for those of you without jquery built into your master page.

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SharePoint workflow that creates a document based on a template

Outcome:

process

docoutcome

Intro:

Look at that workflow above – have you ever seen something so beautifully simple? I’m excited to share several solutions with you in this one post. This post should cover the following:

  1. Working with content types
  2. Creating a template for each content type capable of having merge fields
  3. Finding a way to merge list item info into a new document via workflow
  4. And if you’re super ambitious, expanding the workflow just a bit with an if/then statement to use different templates based on conditions in your list

But because this is a massive topic and could be tailored an infinite number of ways, I encourage you to comment or tweet me for additional guidance more specific to your scenario. So here we go!

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Alternating row shading in a SharePoint list

outcomerowshading

Update 9/12/17: Video tutorial at bottom of post

Alternating list row colors can help your list go from zero to hero in just a few minutes. It’s another quick fix that makes your data easier on your viewers’ eyes and helps with user adoption, especially those coming from programs and platforms that had alternating row colors built-in.

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