capture

Intro:

If you’ve created a dashboard and have multiple list view web parts that you’ve connected to one another so that they share parameters or filters, then you may be familiar with this default double arrow icon: doublearrow

You may have even found it to be located at _layouts/images/rbunsel.gif or _layouts/images/rbsel.gif (depending on whether it’s the “selected” or “unselected” icon).

And now you’re ready to replace it with something a little more fashionable. I recommend installing an icon package (free) on your site so that you can use icons from the set throughout your site to continue customizing various out of the box, and quite ordinary, icons. In this post, we’ll use FontAwesome. Check out their amazing set of icons at http://fontawesome.io/icons/ and even try searching for “open” or “expand” to see some good alternatives to the less-than-perfect double arrow default. For this example, let’s use fa-search-plus.

Ready to step up your icon game? Me too.

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Outcome:

stickyheadersbeforeafter

Intro:

Large lists carry with them a number of challenges, one being the ease of keeping everything straight when you’re thirty scrolls deep into a page. Sticky/floating headers are an excellent addition to your SharePoint lists that keep your headers at the top of your columns no matter where you’re at in the list for ease of viewing. This solution uses a script created by Daniel Stölzner of spoodoo.com and I’ve added a reference to jquery to simplify steps for those of you without jquery built into your master page.

Outcome:

process

docoutcome

Intro:

Look at that workflow above – have you ever seen something so beautifully simple? I’m excited to share several solutions with you in this one post. This post should cover the following:

  1. Working with content types
  2. Creating a template for each content type capable of having merge fields
  3. Finding a way to merge list item info into a new document via workflow
  4. And if you’re super ambitious, expanding the workflow just a bit with an if/then statement to use different templates based on conditions in your list

But because this is a massive topic and could be tailored an infinite number of ways, I encourage you to comment or tweet me for additional guidance more specific to your scenario. So here we go!

Outcome:overlaysbeforeafter.PNGIntro:

So you’ve made a SharePoint calendar. In fact, you’ve even made some different views for it and then made those views into overlays. Hoorah!

But now, looking at the finished product, the unevenness of the overlay links leaves something to be desired. This post will show you how to take your overlays and, in just a few minutes, turn them into a more polished look as seen above.